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Showing posts from 2013

Copyrights & Trademarks: How to Protect Your Music

I've written about the difference between copyrights and trademarks before. Yesterday's post focused on literary works, which could certainly have commonalities (e.g. lyrics) with today's subject. From the written word to the spoken - today we're talking about...


SOUND RECORDINGS
Over the years we've worked with all kinds of musicians running the gamut of genres - rock and roll, country, hip hop, and even a Frankie Valli tribute band. Just like those creating literary works folks creating anything with sound will likely need copyrights and trademarks.
MUSICIANS & BANDS
Copyright
"Sound recordings are defined in the law as 'works that result from the fixation of a series of musical, spoken, or other sounds, but not including the sounds accompanying a motion picture or other audiovisual work.' Common examples include recordings of music, drama, or lectures." 

So any format which is "fixed" (i.e. CDs, MP3s, record albums, etc.) AND emits soun…

Copyrights & Trademarks: How to Protect Your Book

I've written about the difference between copyrights and trademarks before but I thought it a good idea to get into the nitty-gritty of specific works. Today's post is about...


LITERARY WORKS
We've had the pleasure of assisting many writers and publishers over the years (need help with both? Check out The 90 Day Author) and this is a group of folks that need both copyrights and trademarks. Let's break it down, shall we?

WRITERS


First, congratulations! Whether you've completed a novel, a reference book, a cookbook, a children's book, or any major text, please take a moment to pat yourself on the back. That's quite an accomplishment and should be savored!

Now that you've got the creative-y stuff settled it's time to get to business, namely, the business of protecting your work. Simply put, copyright your printed works and trademark any element that you'll be using in commerce. 

Copyright

Literary works include fiction, non-fiction, poetry, textbooks, cat…

Current TradeMark Express Special - Save $100 off your next trademark order!

Order by tomorrow, Tuesday, November 5th and take $100 off your next trademark order!



TradeMark Express is currently running a post-shutdown special. If you've been holding off on getting started on your research and application filing perhaps taking a hundred bucks off of our Premium Package will entice you!

You may call us to order -OR- just order online
If ordering online, please be sure to reference this special in order to ensure you get the $100 off.

Not sure if you need a trademark? 

Anyone that's started a small business or is in the throes of starting a small business knows how overwhelming it can be just to get to opening day. You've got licenses & permits to think about, what sort of business entity structure is right, where the money is going to come from, and on and on. Phew! While it can almost be too overwhelming, your entrepreneurial drive and your passion for your business will get you through it.

Now when it comes to your business name, we can all agree…

The Government Shutdown and Your Trademarks

Since several clients have asked how the government shutdown may affect their trademarks, we here at TradeMark Express decided it’d be a good idea to provide all of our clients an update.
          First, good news! The USPTO “will remain open...[and will] operate as usual for approximately four weeks.” This means that all “11,789 employees will be excepted” until approximately starting the week of October 28th. This means that all of your trademark needs will be met from filing a new application to submitting renewal forms.
          However, should the reserve funds be exhausted before then the USPTO will shut down. If a shut down happens, regardless of when it occurs, “a very small staff would continue to work to accept new applications and maintain IT infrastructure.” But what does this mean for you?
NEW APPLICATIONS
Even if the USPTO shuts down, new applications will be accepted. Given that it takes about 3-4 months to be assigned to an examining attorney there will be no n…