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Trademark Your Clothing Line

Easily one of the biggest industries we serve over at
TradeMark Express is the clothing industry. Because of that, I thought it was high time to devote a few posts to the different facets of filing for a trademark for your clothing line.

The first subject should definitely be explaining what branches of intellectual property are available for the various items that typically make up a clothing line.

Copyrights, specifically a Visual Art Works filing:

Any artwork/images displayed on the garments themselves, e.g. front of a t-shirt

Fabric designs

Patterns for sewing
Weaving or lace designs

Trademarks:

The name of your clothing line

The logo for your clothing line


I'll get into further detail about these subjects as well as others that are particular to clothing in the coming days.


If you have a specific question you'd like answered about trademarks & the clothing industry, please feel free to
contact me via email

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