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Statement of Use/Amendment to Allege Use for Intent-to-Use Application

Picking up from yesterday's post, let's get further into the additional forms attached to filing an Intent to Use application.

Once the Intent to Use application is filed, the USPTO will move ahead with the filing process as normal but once all the various red tape has been cut, they will need to hear from you that you're using the mark in commerce.

You let them know you're using the mark in commerce by either filing a Statement of Use or an Amendment to Allege Use. Now, it sounds confusing but this is essentially the same form - the only difference being as to the time when it's filed.

Amendment to Allege Use:

This is "a sworn statement signed by the applicant or a person authorized to sign on behalf of the applicant attesting to use of the mark in commerce. With the AAU, the owner must submit one specimen showing use of the mark in commerce for each class of goods/services included in the application, and the required fee.

...must be filed before the date the examining attorney approves the mark for publication in the Official Gazette."

Statement of Use:

"sworn statement signed by the applicant or a person authorized to sign on behalf of the applicant attesting to use of the mark in commerce...must be filed within 6 months from the date the USPTO issues a notice of allowance. Failure to submit the statement of use in a timely manner results in abandonment of the application."

So the big difference here is that the Amendment to Allege Use is filed BEFORE publication and the Statement of Use is filed AFTER the Notice of Allowance is received.

Publication? Notice of Allowance? Huh? Here are the definitions for each but I'll be sure to devote another post to the application time line.

Publication:

"If the examining attorney raises no objections to registration, or if the applicant overcomes all objections, the examining attorney will approve the mark for publication in the Official Gazette.

The USPTO will send a Notice of Publication to the applicant stating the date of publication. Any party who believes it may be damaged by registration of the mark has thirty (30) days from the publication date to file either an opposition to registration or a request to extend the time to oppose."

Notice of Allowance:

"Written notification from the USPTO that a specific mark has survived the opposition period following publication in the Official Gazette, and has consequently been allowed for registration. It does not mean that the mark has registered yet. Receiving a notice of allowance is another step on the way to registration.

Notices of allowance are only issued for applications that have been filed based on 'intent to use'. The notice of allowance is important because the issue date of the Notice of Allowance establishes the due date for filing a statement of use. After receiving the Notice of Allowance, the applicant must file a statement of use or a request for an extension of time to file a statement of use within 6 months from the issue date of the notice. If the applicant fails to timely file a statement of use or a request for an extension of time to file a statement of use, the application will be abandoned."

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