Skip to main content
Trademark International Class: Class 9 (Electrical and Scientific Apparatus)



All goods or services are categorized within International Classes (IC hereafter). Goods run from classes IC 1-34, while Services are in IC 35-45. Please see a complete chart
here. Let's take a closer look at one of these trademark classes – class 9.

What is International Class 9 All About?


Each class has a short title heading that gives a snapshot of what that class is all about -- IC 9's short title is electrical and scientific apparatus. But, as with anything trademark, there's more to it than that. The USPTO has 3107 accepted descriptions that fit into IC 9; check them out here.

This class encompasses nearly any tangible goods that are scientific, nautical, surveying, electric, photographic, cinematographer, optical, weighing, measuring, signaling, checking (supervision), life-saving and teaching apparatus and instruments; apparatus for recording, transmission or reproduction of sound or images; magnetic data carriers, recording discs; automatic vending machines and mechanisms for coin-operated apparatus; cash registers, calculating machines, data processing equipment and computers; fire-extinguishing apparatus.


PHEW! Let's break that down a bit. Here are some of the more often used descriptions for International Class 9:


Software of all kinds.

Video games, which also include the peripherals such as joysticks, players, interactive floor pads and interactive remote controls as well as
what used to be considered a service – providing online video games.
CDs, DVDs, audiocassettes, records, whether blank or filled with content, as well as the devices used to play them.
Computer peripherals such as mice, keyboards, printers, and monitors as well as virtually any good related to the telephone, the television or the camera.


What Else is in International Class 9?


Seems like with any of these trademark classes, there always seems to be the oddball item or two and IC 9 is no exception. Here are a few items living in IC 9 that seem to be a weird fit:


• sun glasses, eye glasses and
pince-nez
• protective clothing

• dog whistles

• helmets


What's New for International Class 9?


The classification guide is constantly being updated with new goods or services. As the marketplace changes, the trademark office must adapt. Here are some of the 2009 listings for international class 9, good plus date added to the guide:


• Graduated rulers for office and stationery 25 Jun 09

• Hands free devices for mobile-phones 18 Jun 09

• Holders for magnetically encoded gift cards 02 Apr 09

• Life vests 26 Mar 09

• Articles of protective clothing for wear by motorcyclists for protection against accident or injury 5 Feb 09

• Digital music system that synchronizes digital music files stored on a home unit and a car unit 15 Jan 09

- Mention our blog & receive $25 off of our Premium Package -
- Put BLOG in the Contact Name field -

Comments

john patinson said…
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

Popular posts from this blog

Trademark International Class: Class 35 (Advertising and Business Services)
All goods or services are categorized within International Classes (IC hereafter). Goods run from classes IC 1-34, while Services are in IC 35-45. Please see a complete chart here. Let's take a closer look at one of these trademark classes – class 35.

What is International Class 35 All About?

Each class has a short title heading that gives a snapshot of what that class is all about -- IC 35's short title is advertising and business services. Pretty vague, eh? The USPTO has 1476 accepted descriptions that fit into IC 35; check them out here.

The first part of IC 35’s description, advertising, is straightforward. If it’s advertising, marketing or promoting services that are being offered, then IC 35 is where it goes. Now there are going to be some exceptions, as with anything related to trademarks.
Tangible advertising goods, such as signs, flyers, brochures, are NOT going to be in IC 35 as those items are n…

Trademark 101: State Trademark or Federal Trademark?

Now that you know what a trademark is, what a trademark isn’t, and that you should get a trademark, let’s explore if a State trademark or Federal trademark is most appropriate for your needs.
For the USA, trademarks can be obtained either at the State level or the Federal level. So, which do you need? I’ll explain both and that’ll give you a clearer picture as where to go from here.
First and foremost, a State trademark gives you trademark protection for that specific state whereas a Federal trademark gives you trademark protection nationwide. Simple enough, yes? But, which is the right trademark for your needs?
1)Are you actively in business? 2)Are you only doing business in one city or county or just statewide?
If you answered yes to both, then exploring a State trademark is your next step. Here are some advantages to a State trademark:
·The right to expand statewide. The name will be waiting for you in other metros. ·If another mark is infringing upon yours within the state, you’ll have a…

Trademark 101: Should You Trademark?

Now that we know what a trademark is and is not, let’s dive into the next logical question: should you trademark?
The easiest way to answer this question is to look at your business and your plans for it.
-Is the name, logo, or slogan an integral part of your business? -Are you doing business on a statewide or nationwide or international level? If you’re only doing business citywide or countywide, do you see potential for geographical growth? -Would another business in your industry using the same or similar name hurt your business? In other words, is it possible you’d lose customers if someone had the same or similar name in your industry?
If you answered yes to any of the above then exploring a trademark is the way to go.
Here’s what a US Federal trademark gives you:
·A legal presumption of your ownership of the mark and your exclusive right to use the mark nationwide on or in connection with the goods/services listed in the registration (whereas a state registration only provides rights…